What A Washed-Out Driveway Taught Me About Resilience by Phyllis L. Cohen

You know the debate—the one that almost every couple has when their kids have started lives on their own. Ours had escalated in my living room for months: were we ready to downsize and sell the house? We’d deliberated over the pluses and minuses and determined, finally, for a few more years and for a variety of reasons, that we would stay in our home. The decision came with great diffidence but with a consolation Read more…

The Empty Nest and Other Downsizing Myths…by Phyllis L. Cohen

I refuse to be called an Empty Nester. While it is true that my youngest graduated from Georgetown over a year ago, my house and my life are far from empty. I work fulltime and enjoy seeing friends. My husband and I visit our kids when they ask (and I’m thrilled they still ask). Together we successfully taught both of our children how to become independent adults, but for us, keeping a meaningful and interesting Read more…

“Leaving A Legacy of… Interesting” by Phyllis L. Cohen

I’m pretty grateful for the healthy, mostly content people my children have become. I’m not particularly proud of all the life choices made over the years–for example, why did I wait until I purchased my first condo in the New York suburbs before I learned how to drive? Or–what was I thinking when my husband cajoled me into moving to a rural 1830’s farmhouse in Northern Vermont while my kids were small? My husband and Read more…

Job Hunting After Age 40? Make Yourself Memorable–by Phyllis L. Cohen

If you’ve been actively job hunting for a while, by now you’ve gotten over any fears of letting the world know about it. Or have you? Job hunters in the autumn of their career are told to perfect their resumes to hide their age, leave out the date of their college graduation and use a functional resume format rather than a chronological one. And every Monday morning they don’t hesitate to regurgitate the content of Read more…

Lifting The Veil of The Invisible Consumer–by Phyllis L. Cohen

It’s no surprise why boomers get indignant when they watch a television commercial for a new car or smart phone when it’s clear that the brand has missed the mark. If a slim, 30-something model with flowing gray hair is pitching incontinence products, or a male millenial disguised in thick glasses and a Dad-sweater tries to sell us on the merits of a reverse mortgage, it’s time to switch channels. These visual punchlines don’t reflect Read more…